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to function. even john john paul ii. what is it about this pope that he decided to step down? >> i think there are a couple of things going on there. with john paul ii he knew he was dying. i don't think benedict is so seriously ill that he's going to die but he could -- you know, live for another 10 years. he's got an older brother. and being in the papacy and not to be up for the job. so i think he decided that it was best for the church to go at this point and let someone else carry the burden. >> bill: now as "the new york times" says, the church is at a crossroads in the sense that where the church used to be strong, it is not so much anymore and it is in a developing world in africa and in south america and in asia where the church is showing great growth. what does that say about a future pope? >> well, there's two theories here. one is you go and find somebody from africa where the church is truly growing. on the other hand, the other theory is no, you look for someone who can deal with the problems of the church, where it has real big problems, namely europe where it is in decli
appointed by his predecessor, john paul ii. and the two of them in terms of dock tin were right down the -- doctrine were right down the line together. the pope is going to be one of them right? we really can't expect any major changes in the direction of the church or can we? >> well, we're certainly hoping for sister simone campbell. >> bill: she's got my voice. >> unfortunately, she's not of the right gender as per vatican rules. hopefully some day that will change. >> bill: it has to be a priest. therefore has to be a man. >> correct. >> bill: if is one of these -- we've talked before about -- and i've written about some of the things the church i think has to do something about allowing priests to get married. has to do something about allowing women to be ordained, just for starters. you know, what are the chances we'll get out of this group of 115, a pope who will go in that direction? >> i think your instincts are right that there's a lot of group think going on in the conclave. a lot of folks appointed to positions of authority based on their loyalty to the institution less
grateful for him to part -- for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton , where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thankso professor koppelman. i have a pleasure of speaki
the senate took up that same bill and even though it was hand-crafted by john boehner, eric cantor, and paul ryan, minority leader mitch mcconnell and 32 other republican senators opposed it. mcconnell's office released a statement saying leader mcconnell and other senate republicans had several amendments aimed forcing washington to cut government spending, but all were defeated by democrats. as a result, the leader simply couldn't support the bill. the word on capitol hill is that mcconnell's no vote was meant to appease his unruly kentucky constituents. perhaps angered over mcconnell's compromise on the fiscal cliff made last month with vice president joe biden. that deal averted a potential downgrade of america's credit rating. speaker boehner's bill to extend the debt limit did much the same, but for the extreme right wing flank of the gop, supporting two bills to prevent possibly catastrophic damage to the u.s. economy is perhaps one bill too far. glen, we talk a lot about the tunnel that ends in heart break that the gop may or may not be hurdling down, but these votes lately on the hi
championed it. it was john boehner and company and paul ryan of the so-called budget hawks. they made it so disastrous that they thought nobody could ever, ever, ever go along with this. now they reversed themselves and say let's do it. i think the american people know whose fingerprints are all over this baby. i just hope that they come to their senses beforehand and it doesn't happen. there is other stuff in the news. when we come back, jesse jackson jr. and his wife both on trial here in washington, d.c. yesterday, lynn sweet who knows chicago politics and has covered chicago politics better than anybody else alive joins us in the next segment. she was in the courthouse yesterday. she talked to congressman jackson. she'll tell us all about it. >> announcer: on your radio and on current tv, this is the "bill press show." agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)